Soy Bean
soy bean

soybeans

soy bean 1

 

Soy Bean

+ Moisture: 15% max
+ Admixture : 1% max
+ Flatoxin : 5 PPB max
+ Natural color
+ Packing: in new PP bags of 50kgs each net
+ Clean, dry and no mold
+ Style: Dried
+ Origin: Vietnam

Health benefits
Cardiovascular Benefits
In repeated research findings, whole food soybeans have been shown to provide us with better cardiovascular support than dietary supplements containing soy components. “Better” in this case means not only more consistent but also more in-depth cardiovascular support.
The most consistent effect of soybean intake on blood fats has been a moderate lowering of LDL cholesterol. Some studies show other positive impacts on blood fats, such as the lowering of triglycerides and total cholesterol or the raising of HDL cholesterol (the “good” cholesterol). However, these additional blood fat results have not been confirmed in all studies.

Soyasaponins can lessen the rate of lipid peroxidation in blood vessels, lessen absorption of cholesterol from the GI tract, and increase excretion of fecal bile acids. All of these events would be expected to contribute to a decreased risk of cardiovascular disease.

Cancer Prevention Benefits

Many studies provide us with evidence that supports the role of whole soy foods in a cancer-preventing diet. Genistein (an isoflavone phytonutrient in soy) is often a key focus in these cancer-prevention studies. This soy isoflavone can increase activity of a tumor suppressor protein called p53. When p53 becomes more active, it can help trigger programmed cell death (apoptosis) in cancer cells, and it also help trigger cell cycle arrest (helping stop ongoing cancer cell activity). Genistein has also been shown to block the activity of protein kinases in a way that can help slow tumor formation, especially in the case of breast and prostate cancer. It’s also worth noting here that genistein becomes more concentrated in soy foods when those foods are fermented.

Soy and Hot Flashes
Hot flashes are very common symptoms of menopause and peri-menopause in women (often called “night sweats” when they occur at night) can cause great suffering and can easily affect mood throughout the day and impair concentration. Approximately 70-80% of U.S. women of menopausal and peri-menopausal age experience hot flashes, in comparison with approximately 10-20% of Asian women. By comparison, the average level of the soy isoflavone genistein in the bloodstream of Asian women is approximately 25 nanograms per milliliter, but in U.S. women, only 2 nanograms. This sharp contrast between frequency of hot flash symptoms and soy genistein levels has led many researchers to wonder about the hot flash-preventing potential of soybeans. Unfortunately, most studies to date fail to establish a reliable connection between dietary soy intake and occurrence of hot flashes. It’s possible that future research studies will tell a different story, but at present, we aren’t aware of any findings that show clear benefits for hot flash relief from increased intake of soy.

Bone Health Benefits
The area of bone health benefits from soy has remained nearly as controversial as the anti-cancer area due to the large amount of mixed evidence found in human studies on soy and bone health. In support of bone benefits has been the finding in many studies of improved markers of bone health following consumption of soy. In addition, a lower rate of osteoporosis in some countries has been associated with increased intake of whole soy foods, especially fermented whole soybean foods. At the same time, however, soy intake has often failed to show any improvement in bone mineral density or bone metabolism.

Some of the mixed findings appear to be related to conversion of the soy isoflavone, daidzein, by intestinal bacteria into a metabolite called equol. Soy foods appear to be more helpful in supporting bone (for example, in lessening loss of minerals from bone) when individual metabolism and gut micro-organisms support the conversion of daidzein into equol. There is also some evidence that this entire process may be under some level of genetic regulation.

Soybeans and Obesity
Increased protein intake has always been associated with suppression of appetite, and plant foods like soy that provide concentrated amounts of protein have a research-based ability to help suppress appetite. (Of course, our experience of appetite is very complicated, and there is no simple way to change our appetite exclusively through diet.) Some studies on unique peptides (protein-like components) in soy have shown the ability of this peptides to decrease synthesis of SREBPs (sterol regulatory element binding proteins), thereby helping decrease synthesis of certain fatty acids as well as depositing of these fatty acids in fat cells. This fascinating research on soyfoods and obesity is still in the early stages, however.

Soybeans and Type 2 Diabetes
A second area of potential health benefit is prevention of type 2 diabetes. In multiple animal studies, soy foods have been shown to lessen insulin resistance by increasing the synthesis of insulin receptors. However, this increased formation of insulin receptors only appears to occur in the presence of other dietary circumstances, like a moderate amount of polyunsaturated fat intake. High levels of total soy intake (approximately 200 grams per day) have also been associated with decreased risk of type 2 diabetes, but only in Asian populations thus far. We look forward to more research on human consumption of soy and prevention of chronic health problems related to insulin metabolism and blood sugar levels.

Soybeans and Vitamin K

Soybeans of all kinds qualify as a good source of vitamin K based on our food-nutrient ranking system. However, your vitamin K benefits from soybeans may be increased in the case of certain fermented soy foods. From a health standpoint, one of the reasons that Bacillus bacteria are so interesting is their ability to create a form of vitamin K called menaquinone-7 (MK-7). Vitamin K (in all forms) is an important nutrient for bone health. Sufficient intake of vitamin K is associated with decreased risk of osteoporosis, since this vitamin is involved with maintenance of bone mineral density and also with shaping of bone structure (through gamma-carboxylation). If Bacillus bacteria from fermented soy foods can remain alive in our digestive tract, they may keep providing us with vitamin K benefits many days after their consumption.

Other Areas of Potential Health Benefit
Other areas of active research on soy and health include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), periodontal disease, and neurodegenerative disease.

* Important Disclaimer

The information that is available at or through this site is not intended directly or by implication to either diagnose or treat any medical, emotional, or psychological condition or disorder. It is always recommended that consultation with local health care providers be obtained for specific health or medical concerns.

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